hiding in the silver lining

John Turner bought a scratch-off lottery ticket after a hard day of work last Sunday.

Instant karma!

New Jersey native John Turner, 38, returned to his home state to help with the Hurricane Sandy relief effort, and left $70,000 richer after hitting the jackpot in a Garden State lottery.
Turner, who runs a water removal business in Chicago, knew that his skills and equipment were desperately needed when Sandy ravaged New Jersey.
Shocked by the devastation, Turner even emptied out some flooded homes free of charge for families that got hit particularly hard by the storm.  full story
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Whole Foods
The store nicknamed “Whole Paycheck” for its high prices surprised some Manhattan residents with a generous offer earlier this week. On October 31, Whole Foods  in New York’s Tribeca district — one of the neighborhoods that lost power Monday night and is still waiting for the lights to come back on — had food on shelves and in storage that was about to go bad. Management could have held a fire sale but instead decided to hand out all perishables for free. Twitter alerts brought instant crowds and news crews.  (source)
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Adorama
Any retailer that allowed residents without power to charge their cell phones and computers became a hero this week, and remains such. Meanwhile Adorama, a camera store on West 18th Street, went one further, setting up a charging station in front of its storefront.  (source)
 U-Haul
Free self-storage would thrill any real estate-deprived New York area resident even in the best of times. During the Hurricane Sandy recovery, dry, clean space is even more valuable, especially to those facing property damage or those forced to bunk with friends, family, or strangers.  Right now, U-Haul is offering 30 days of free self-storage and U-Box pod moving to assist victims of the storm. (source)
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Duracell
Duracell  gained some energized fans by taking to the streets of the New York metro area this week with its Duracell Rapid Responder truck. Employees handed out free batteries and access to charging lockers.  (source)
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On the Upper East Side, residents of 200 East End Ave. — many of them elderly — found themselves without power after the storm flooded their basement. And just like that, their neighbors across the street at 180 East End offered to take them in. That was welcome news for Mike Traub, 74, who suffers from muscular dystrophy and gets around with a scooter — but who lives on the ninth floor of 200 East End, and had no way of getting downstairs. Or so he thought. The building’s porter, Luis Cortes, carried him down. “I knocked on the door and said you need to get out, but he said he couldn’t walk. I said no problem, and carried him down nine flights. It was difficult, but I did what I had to do” said Cortes, 53.

HEROES: Luis Cortes (left) carried Mike Traub down nine flights and José Murillo (right) got him across the street.

David McGlynn
HEROES: Luis Cortes (left) carried Mike Traub down nine flights and José Murillo (right) got him across the street.

Another building employee, José Murillo, carried Traub across the street. When he got to his host’s apartment, “They were very welcoming, and food was pushed on us. Cakes, coffee, salads, soups.” Traub’s wife, Bonnie, said, “They were super wonderful. They put little chocolates on our pillows and they made us an incredible breakfast. New Yorkers are the greatest people in the world.” in all the years i’ve lived here, i never understood why new yorkers have a reputation for being rude & uncaring.  my experience has been just the opposite. on the countless occasions i’ve seen people fall down or be in need of help, there are always plenty of people tripping over each other to offer assistance.  One of those who played host to displaced neighbors was Robert Horowitz, 82, a part-time Traffic Court judge in Nassau County, and his retired teacher wife, Micki, 81. “I spoke to my wife, and we said [to the people working downstairs], ‘Send someone up who needs a bed.’ ” They sent up Dorothy Kreindler, 80. “They were true good Samaritans, as many people were there and at 170 [East End],” Kreindler said. “They are wonderful people.” __________________________

In Red Hook, the west side of the neighborhood was still without power, with elderly residents essentially trapped inside of their apartments. Dorothy Robinson, 94, stayed in her fifth-floor apartment on Center Mall in the Red Hook Houses. “I’ve seen worse. World War II was worse,” Robinson (above) said. “But I didn’t think it was going to be this bad.” Now she’s running out of food, as is Joshua Rodney, who’s also on the fifth floor. Rodney, 85, has a leg injury and breathing problems. “God, oh mercy, I can’t go down the stairs,” Rodney said. Both are now relying on the kindness of strangers, and those strangers have been reliable. Yesterday, volunteer Conor Tomas Reed, 31, of the Red Hook Initiative, brought plates of rice, beans and vegetables, along with gallons of water for residents.  full story

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Worried that the hen would become a victim of the looming “Frankenstorm,” the pair picked the gentle bird up and took it home with them. There, they made her a bed from a cardboard box and lined it with T-shirts to make her comfortable in the kitchen as the hurricane approached.

Chris Mottalini and Nepal Asatthawa

Cynthia R. Fagen
Chris Mottalini and Nepal Asatthawa

“She was so freaked out by the storm, she wouldn’t stop clucking,” said Mottalini. On Tuesday, the no-longer-spooked hen showed her thanks by laying them an egg.  full story

a simple reminder of all the good people we are surrounded by –  always.

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“When people show you who they are, believe them.”
~ Maya Angelou

9 responses to “hiding in the silver lining

  1. What a great post! I read every word! So good to see how wonderful people are when rotten things happen. 🙂

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  2. Thank you so much for this. So needed. Will be tweeting, pinning, and using each story as a part of my posts giving you credit.

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  3. Reblogged this on Emotional Fitness and commented:
    Heroes of my heart. The things each of us can do in our part of the world by caring and sharing, being kind and generous have made the world the wonder it is despite the bad times.

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  4. Found I could reblog once I signed in. Will still use the individual stories in the coming weeks. Thank you again.

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  5. “If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.” May we all imitate New Yorkers! Bravo!

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  6. Reblogged this on Family Survival Protocol and commented:
    Add your thoughts here… (optional)

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